Dad’s ‘light bulb moment’ led to the child’s diagnosis with a life -limiting condition

Matthew McCormack, from Widnes in Cheshire, was looking for another condition on the internet when he saw Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Matthew McCormack began to notice something strange about his son when he watched with other classmates. Arthur posed with his sister Audrey.

A father is “heartbroken, devastated and confused” after doctors confirmed his worst fears about his son.

Last year, Matthew McCormack’s son Arthur was diagnosed with a life -limiting condition – and it was him parents realizes how the seven -year -old is different from other children that led to the discovery.

Mr. McCormark and his wife Samantha noticed these differences about Arthur, but not until the father researched other conditions on the internet they encountered Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

And then, in March 2020, Arthur was diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic disease caused by muscle weakness and wasting, the Liverpool Echo.








Matthew with wife Samantha, son Arthur and daughter Audrey
(

Photo:

Matthew McCormack)



The condition has been described as one of the most common and severe forms of muscular dystrophy The NHS, stating that people with the condition usually only live into their 20s or 30s

The 34-year-old father from Widnes, a town south of Liverpool in Cheshire, said: “We always knew he was a bit slower than other kids but we just put it on him when he was young.

“In 2019 he had a sports day at school and we noticed that he was slower than his classmates.

“He also has difficulty on the stairs to the house and the way he descends to the ground is different.”

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Mr. McCormark said when he saw the symptoms of DMD it was a light bulb moment.

He said: “I was looking for something else. My father was having problems with his legs but when I looked up I encountered Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

“Just looking at all these symptoms is a light bulb moment,” adding: “Once I combined the two and two I took him right away to the doctors.”








Family friends have set up a fundraiser to help buy Arthur an all-terrain wheelchair he will need in the coming years.
(

Photo:

Matthew McCormack)










Arthur’s father said his son was “a very happy boy” and described him as “his little hero”
(

Photo:

Matthew McCormack)



In March 2020, doctors diagnosed Arthur with Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD), a genetic disease caused by muscle weakness and wasting.

DMD almost always affects men and is usually diagnosed in childhood between the ages of three and six, which is one of the most common and severe forms of muscular dystrophy.

Mr. McCormark said: “There is no cure, it is a life-limiting condition. His life expectancy is between 15 and 30. I know some kids who have passed with it this year who are 16 years old. just old. “





The parents also have a four -year -old daughter, Audrey. She said they won’t know until she’s older if she has a genetic mutation caused by DMD, and it can be passed on if she has children in the future.

Explaining their heartbreak upon hearing Arthur’s diagnosis, Matthew said: “Your world is broken. We are heartbroken, devastated, confused.

“It just breaks you down. You start to think about all the things you planned for him to grow up, all the things you can’t do for him and the things he’s going to miss.”








Arthur and his cat, Bart
(

Photo:

Matthew McCormack)










His father said Arthur knew “as a seven -year -old should know”
(

Photo:

Matthew McCormack)



Family friends have set up a fundraiser to help buy Arthur an all-terrain wheelchair he will need in the coming years. If you would like to make a donation towards the fundraising event set up for Arthur, click here.

The father said: “Arthur knows what a seven -year -old needs to know. He knows muscle isn’t good. We’re not going to lie to him but he’s asking.”

Adding: “But he’s a very happy boy, he’s my little hero. He’s the strongest person I know – he just gets along with it.

“You feel bad sometimes because he has the condition and you feel bad in anger.

“He just didn’t let anything interfere with him. If he couldn’t do anything he would try and find a way to do it.”


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